80% of all pets have some form of dental disease by the time they reach age 3.

With proper dental care and preventive measures, you can extend your pet’s life, simply by taking care of your fur baby’s teeth. Be proactive with your fluffy pal’s periodontal health by beginning a dental care regimen as soon as you bring your new companion home, and you will enjoy more years of happy memories together through good oral health.

80% of all pets have some form of dental disease by the time they reach age 3.

With proper dental care and preventive measures, you can extend your pet’s life, simply by taking care of your fur baby’s teeth. Be proactive with your fluffy pal’s periodontal health by beginning a dental care regimen as soon as you bring your new companion home, and you will enjoy more years of happy memories together through good oral health.

Signs of Dental Disease

Many people believe doggy breath is perfectly normal for their furry pals, but stinky breath is one of the first signs of dental disease in pets.

If your pupperino leans in for a slobbery kiss and you turn your head to escape their foul breath, it’s time for a dental checkup.

Other signs of dental disease in pets can include:

Red, inflamed, swollen, or bleeding gums

Excessive drooling

Yellow, gray, or brown tartar buildup on the teeth

Fur caught in between the teeth

Difficulty chewing hard food, toys, or treats

Pawing at the face

Head-shy

Dropping food when eating

At the first hint of a periodontal problem, schedule an appointment for your fur baby. If left untreated, oral bacteria can leach into your pet’s bloodstream and attack organs, leading to disease.

Don’t forget that pocket pets and birds need dental care, too! Rabbits and rodents can suffer from overgrown teeth, while birds may occasionally need their beaks trimmed. Please call us to discuss your unique pet’s dental care needs.
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Signs of Dental Disease

Many people believe doggy breath is perfectly normal for their furry pals, but stinky breath is one of the first signs of dental disease in pets.

If your pupperino leans in for a slobbery kiss and you turn your head to escape their foul breath, it’s time for a dental checkup.

Other signs of dental disease in pets can include:

Red, inflamed, swollen, or bleeding gums

Excessive drooling

Yellow, gray, or brown tartar buildup on the teeth

Fur caught in between the teeth

Difficulty chewing hard food, toys, or treats

Pawing at the face

Head-shy

Dropping food when eating

At the first hint of a periodontal problem, schedule an appointment for your fur baby. If left untreated, oral bacteria can leach into your pet’s bloodstream and attack organs, leading to disease.

Don’t forget that pocket pets and birds need dental care, too! Rabbits and rodents can suffer from overgrown teeth, while birds may occasionally need their beaks trimmed. Please call us to discuss your unique pet’s dental care needs.
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Pet Dental Care

in Ozone Park

If your pet’s breath is knocking you out, it’s past time to schedule an oral exam and dental cleaning. For the freshest breath in all the Howard Beach, Ozone Park, and Richmond Hill areas, turn to the team at Veterinary Care Unlimited to clean up your pet’s dirty mouth. Give us a call to discuss your furry pal’s periodontal problems and to schedule an appointment.

Pet Dental Care

in Ozone Park

If your pet’s breath is knocking you out, it’s past time to schedule an oral exam and dental cleaning. For the freshest breath in all the Howard Beach, Ozone Park, and Richmond Hill areas, turn to the team at Veterinary Care Unlimited to clean up your pet’s dirty mouth. Give us a call to discuss your furry pal’s periodontal problems and to schedule an appointment.